American Whites Leaving State Schooling System in Increasing Numbers

RNS-HOME-SCHOOLThe dramatic Third Worldization of American society caused by the immigration invasion has resulted in a huge increase in white parents resorting to homeschooling rather than sending their children to lowered-standard Third World state schools.

Since 1999, the number of children who are being homeschooled has increased by 75 percent, according to new statistics.

Although currently only 4 percent of all school children nationwide are educated at home, the number of primary school children whose parents choose to forgo traditional education is growing seven times faster than the number of children enrolling in K-12 every year.

Any concerns expressed about the quality of education offered to the children by their parents can surely be put to rest by the consistently high placement of homeschooled children on standardized assessment exams.

Data shows that those who are independently educated typically score between 65th and 89th percentile on such exams, while those attending traditional schools average on the 50th percentile.

Furthermore, the achievement gaps, long plaguing school systems around the country, aren’t present in the homeschooling environment.

Recent studies laud homeschoolers’ academic success, noting their significantly higher ACT-Composite scores as high schoolers and higher grade point averages as college students.

The average expenditure for the education of a homeschooled child, per year, is $500 to $600, compared to an average expenditure of $10,000 per child, per year, for public school students.

College recruiters from the best schools in the United States aren’t slow to recognize homeschoolers’ achievements. Those from non-traditional education environments matriculate in colleges and attain a four-year degree at much higher rates than their counterparts from public and even private schools.

Homeschoolers are actively recruited by schools like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Stanford University and Duke.

Nor do homeschoolers miss out on the so-called socialization opportunities, something considered a vital part of a traditional school environment and “lacking” in those who don’t attend regular schools.





On the contrary, those educated at home by their parents tend to be more socially engaged than their peers, and according to the National Home Education Research Institute survey, demonstrate “healthy social, psychological, and emotional development, and success into adulthood.”

Based on recent data, researchers such as Dr. Brian Ray (NHERI.org) “expect to observe a notable surge in the number of children being homeschooled in the next 5 to 10 years. The rise would be in terms of both absolute numbers and percentage of the K to 12 student population. This increase would be in part because . . . [1] a large number of those individuals who were being home educated in the 1990s may begin to homeschool their own school-age children and [2] the continued successes of home-educated students.”

According to the US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (2009), The Condition of Education 2009 (NCES 2009-081),  Indicator 6  report, the number of homeschooled students was about 1.5 million, an increase from 850,000 in 1999 and 1.1 million in 2003.

The percentage of the school-age population that was homeschooled increased from 1.7 percent in 1999 to 2.9 percent in 2007. The increase in the percentage of homeschooled students from 1999 to 2007 represents a 74 percent relative increase over the 8-year period and a 36 percent relative increase since 2003.

More white students were homeschooled than black or Hispanic students or students from other racial/ethnic groups, and white students constituted the majority of homeschooled students (77 percent). White students (3.9 percent) had a higher homeschooling rate than blacks (0.8 percent) and Hispanics (1.5 percent).

Students in two-parent households made up 89 percent of the homeschooled population, and those in two-parent households with one parent in the labor force made up 54 percent of the homeschooled population.

Parents give many different reasons for homeschooling their children. In 2007, the most common reason parents gave as the most important was a desire to provide religious or moral instruction (36 percent of students).

This reason was followed by a concern about the school environment, such as safety, drugs, or negative peer pressure (21 percent), dissatisfaction with academic instruction (17 percent), and “other reasons” including family time, finances, travel, and distance (14 percent).

Parents of about 7 percent of homeschooled students cited the desire to provide their child with a nontraditional approach to education as the most important reason for homeschooling, and the parents of another 6 percent of students cited a child’s health problems or special needs.


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