Osama Bin Laden’s Bodyguard Lives on $2,200 per month “Refugee” Benefits in Germany

Osama Bin Laden’s Tunisian former bodyguard and his family live in Germany as “refugees” taking home welfare benefits in excess of €1,800 ($2,200) every month since 1997—and cannot be deported back home because he faces arrest and imprisonment in his home country, it has emerged.

According to German media reports, the bodyguard, named only as “Sami A.” to protect his identity, he is known to have had direct contacts with the Muslim terrorists involved in the 9-11 attacks in New York City and the Pentagon.

The amount of money Sami A is being paid was revealed after a state parliament question from the AfD party to the North Rhine Westphalia government. In terms of the Asylum Seekers Act, the NRW state government admitted that Sami A. receives €1167.48 per month, and additional payments of around €150 for each of his four children.

In addition, Sami A. gets “other benefits,” but these are confidential under data protection laws. These benefits will include healthcare and housing costs.

Sami A. moved to Germany in 1996 to “study engineering.” However, from 1999 to 2000, he took part in Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan, and while there, served as a bodyguard to Bin Laden. Afterward, he returned to Germany once again.





In 2009, Sami A. was detained along with another Al-Qaeda terrorist in a vehicle in Germany.

However, all attempts to deport Sami A. have failed. His first defense against deportation was that he was married to a German woman (apparently a Muslim with legal residency and German citizenship). Then a court ruled that his “right to a family life” would be affected if he were to be deported.

A renewed effort to expel him failed in April 2017 when a court ruled that “despite the changes in the political situation in Tunisia, there is a risk that Sami A. would face inhumane treatment” should he be returned to his home country.

The case is is outrageous that even the local Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party representatives—who are normaly pro-invasion—are unhappy. “In this case, the German asylum law is being shamelessly exploited,” Eckhardt Rehberg, chairman of the CDU’s Household Budget Working Group in the NRW parliament said.

“We have to finance a terrorist with tax money because we cannot deport him.”


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