Turkey-EU Invader “Deal” in Doubt as Greek-Turk Tensions Ruse

Mounting evidence suggests that the invader “migrant” deal stuck between the European Union and Turkey after the mass Third World invasion of 2015 is breaking down, even though Brussels has bribed Ankara with €3 billion since then.

Recent data casts doubt on whether Turkey is living up to its side of the deal. Europol has revealed it is currently tracking 65,000 people smugglers, and in the first two months of 2018, at least 5,000 invaders arrived on Greek shores from Turkey.

Hungary’s border fence has successfully managed to stem most of the invading hordes hoping to reach Germany and Scandinavia, yet it would not stop any mass surge from the Aegean Sea, because Romania, Croatia, Slovenia and Ukraine’s borders are still wide open.

It has been estimated that there are as many as one million Third Worlders currently in Turkey who hope to enter Europe in the next 18 months—a figure that is only likely to increase as the US, the UK and France continue to bomb Syria.

Every time Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron hesitate on renewing the invader “deal,” Turkey appears to loosen its borders and let more invaders through as a sort of blackmail. This is President Recep Erdogan’s way of reminding the EU what happens when Ankara does not receive the money, and is also a testament to how weak and useless European leaders are.

For even when the money is paid, Turkey still allows the invaders to leave its shores, just at a reduced rate, something which goes against the entire premise of the “deal.”

But there is also another factor which could cause the failing invader deal to collapse anyway.

Hostility between Greece and Turkey has been rising for years, but in recent months Turkish Forces have started a new level of intimidation.





Earlier in the year Turkish politicians called for the Greek Aegean islands to be annexed, and Ankara’s current offensive in Syria proves they are not afraid to act on their intentions.

The Turkish navy has also prevented Greek Cypriot ships from starting oil exploration around the Mediterranean, and Turkish jets are now violating Greek airspace every four or five days.

Last week, Greek Forces had to fire tracer rounds at a Turkish helicopter which approached the island of Ro. This incident occurred during the night, and the helicopter reportedly flew at low altitude with its lights switched off, a clear sign it did not want to be discovered.

A Greek pilot died on Thursday last week after his fighter jet crashed into the Aegean Sea. Early reports indicated that the pilot had been chasing a Turkish F16, though this was quickly denied by authorities. Many Greeks vented their fury on social media and accused the government of a cover up.

Politicians in both Greece and Turkey are now openly talking about the possibility of military conflict between the two old foes, and if this does happen the invade deal would obviously become non-existent.

As well as this tension, invader arrivals in Greece have increased dramatically since March, and as the weather improves, even more are expected to come.

Instead of deporting these invaders, the EU has merely agreed to increase funding at UN “refugee” camps across Greece and southern Europe.


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3 Comments

  1. Thank goodness for Brexit.

    If the UK was still tied to the EU, it would be dragged into a conflict in which it has no business or interest.

    1. Just because “Brexit” has happened, doesn’t mean the UK government will change anything. They will change the cosmetics, nothing more.

      We all know the night after the vote, the ruling class said “how dare they don’t do as we ask! Damn the torpedo’s, we’ll move forward with or without them!”

  2. Another million within 18 months, that is the bottom estimate of course. The UN, EU and many of the countries that depend on finance from the EU will not do anything about closing borders. The UK should strengthen its border controls fast because once they get to Calais, the Channel will be packed with little boats ferrying them in, which has been happening for many years.

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